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Poster: JodyC Date: Mar 10, 2006 1:14am
Forum: etree Subject: Re: SAD but true

In many cases the matrix is best of both worlds- the clarity of the soundboard which usually eliminates any "personality" with the ambience of the crowd without listening to conversations while the band is playing.

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Poster: DEADBUCK Date: Mar 10, 2006 3:42am
Forum: etree Subject: Re: SAD but true

Thank you for clearing that up.

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Poster: midnight sun Date: Mar 11, 2006 8:40am
Forum: etree Subject: Re: SAD but true

Gotta like them.
gd84-10-12 and the 88 new years run list them as "Healy" sbd/aud's suggesting the mix was accomplished on the spot.
Anyone know how to go about creating a matrix after the fact with two separate recordings?

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Poster: Cleantone Date: Mar 11, 2006 11:15pm
Forum: etree Subject: Re: SAD but true

It is not exactly "easy". The factors that make it a bit difficult to do well after that fact has to do with tape speed. In todays world it is digital clock. If the recordings are made on the same machine it is not as hard. With tape machines, say a reel to reel deck motor speed can vary. So suppose there is two tape machines, one recording the soundboard and one recording the room sound. Later you want to mix them. Because of the slight variation in motor speed it will fall out of sync. You need to time align the sources. So the begining of the set you need to match say a snare hit. The snare hit from the board tape needs to occur precisly when the snare hit from the room mic occurs. Any difference will create a delay, longer than a couple milliseconds it becomes audible. The motor speed difference makes it hard because after maybe 5 minutes (or 1 minute, or 10 depending) they will get out of sync. This same thing is an issue with modern recording because of the difference with the digital clocks that dictate the recording to digital. This can be overcome but it is not "easy".

Recording both sources on the same machine, or with the same clock source will secure the rate for the entirety of a recording.

Another issue is the way sound can be effected when mixing two sources. When your mixing something like this your combining 2 complex waveforms. There are frequencies across the spectrum on both sources. In laymens term sometime frequencies do not play nice when layed apon eachother. This is a much more complex issue that I wont go into further. As if anyone read this far... ;)

Like anything working with audio takes a lot of practice and is pretty much an eternal learning experience.

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Poster: droncit Date: Mar 11, 2006 11:16pm
Forum: etree Subject: Re: SAD but true

They're not always good. A lot depends on the level of the different sources. Personally, I'd much rather have a matrix where a mic is set on stage to capture audience sound than one that mixes an audience recording with a soundboard, and would actually prefer a clean soundboard to almost any matrix. But, as always, you take what's available and be thankful for all the work someone has put into it.

To make a matrix after the fact, you'll need 2 sources (obviously) and software to synchronize and mix them. It can get tricky if they both come from analog recordings, as the sound is invariably off-speed, so adjustment has to be made.